Mechatronics

Mechatronic system

Mechatronics, also called mechatronics engineering, is an interdisciplinary branch of engineering that focuses on the integration of mechanical, electronic and electrical engineering systems, and also includes a combination of robotics, electronics, computer science, telecommunications, systems, control, and product engineering.[1][2]

As technology advances over time, various subfields of engineering have succeeded in both adapting and multiplying. The intention of mechatronics is to produce a design solution that unifies each of these various subfields. Originally, the field of mechatronics was intended to be nothing more than a combination of mechanics and electronics, hence the name being a portmanteau of mechanics and electronics; however, as the complexity of technical systems continued to evolve, the definition had been broadened to include more technical areas.

The word mechatronics originated in Japanese-English and was created by Tetsuro Mori, an engineer of Yaskawa Electric Corporation. The word mechatronics was registered as trademark by the company in Japan with the registration number of "46-32714" in 1971. The company later released the right to use the word to the public, and the word began being used globally. Currently the word is translated into many languages and is considered an essential term for advanced automated industry.[3]

Many people treat mechatronics as a modern buzzword synonymous with automation, robotics and electromechanical engineering.[4]

French standard NF E 01-010 gives the following definition: "approach aiming at the synergistic integration of mechanics, electronics, control theory, and computer science within product design and manufacturing, in order to improve and/or optimize its functionality".[5]

  1. ^ Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering (9 August 2012). "Mechatronics Engineering". Future undergraduate students. University of Waterloo. Retrieved 21 November 2019.
  2. ^ Faculty of Mechatronics, Informatics and Interdisciplinary Studies TUL. "Mechatronics (Bc., Ing., PhD.)". Retrieved 15 April 2011.
  3. ^ Msc. Mechatronics and Automation Engineering, University of Strathclyde Glasgow, Institution of Engineering and Technology, United Kingdom. Retrieved 29 November 2020.
  4. ^ Lawrence J. Kamm (1996). Understanding Electro-Mechanical Engineering: An Introduction to Mechatronics. John Wiley & Sons. ISBN 978-0-7803-1031-5.
  5. ^ Bolton, W. Mechatronics. Pearson, 6th edition, 2015. ISBN 9781292076683

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