Taliban insurgency

Taliban insurgency
Part of the War in Afghanistan (2001–2021) and the Afghanistan conflict
2021 Taliban Offensive.png
Map of the 2021 Taliban offensive.
Date17 December 2001 – 15 August 2021
(19 years, 7 months, 4 weeks and 1 day)[22]
Location
Result

Taliban victory

Belligerents

 Afghanistan

Allied militias


Formerly:

 Taliban

Support:
 Pakistan[11][12][13][14]
 China (alleged, denied by China)[15][unreliable source?][16]
 Qatar (alleged by Saudi Arabia, denied by Qatar)[17][18]
 Saudi Arabia (overtly until 2001, allegedly until 2013)[19]


Allied groups


Taliban splinter groups (from 2015)

Commanders and leaders

Islamic Republic of Afghanistan Ashraf Ghani
(President of Afghanistan)
Islamic Republic of Afghanistan Abdullah Abdullah
(CEO of Afghanistan)
Islamic Republic of Afghanistan Abdul Rashid Dostum
(Vice-President of Afghanistan)
Islamic Republic of Afghanistan Mohammad Mohaqiq
(Deputy CEO of Afghanistan)
Islamic Republic of Afghanistan Atta Muhammad Nur
(Governor of Balkh Province)
Islamic Republic of Afghanistan Bismillah Khan Mohammadi
(Defense Minister of Afghanistan)
Islamic Republic of Afghanistan Sher Mohammad Karimi
(Chief of Army Staff)
Nangialai [7]
Abdul Manan Niazi [23]
Coalition:

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Major contributing nations with more than 200 troops as of May 2015

Formerly:

Taliban Hibatullah Akhundzada
(Supreme Commander)
[24]
Taliban Sirajuddin Haqqani
(Deputy of the Taliban)
[25]
Taliban Mohammad Yaqoob
(Deputy of the Taliban)
[24]
Taliban Jalaluddin Haqqani #
(Leader of Haqqani Network)
Gulbuddin Hekmatyar
(2002–2016)
Flag of al-Qaeda.svg Ayman al-Zawahiri
(Emir of al-Qaeda)
Taliban Abdul Ghani Baradar
(head of Taliban Diplomatic Office)[26]


Taliban Mansoor Dadullah 
(Commander of the Dadullah Front)[27][28]
Haji Najibullah
(Commander of Fidai Mahaz)
[29]


Formerly:
Taliban Mullah Omar #
(Commander of the Faithful)

Taliban Akhtar Mansoor 
(Supreme Commander)[26][24]
Taliban Obaidullah Akhund 
(Former Taliban Minister of Defense)
[26]
Taliban Mohammad Fazl (POW)
(Former Deputy Defense Minister)
[26]
Taliban Abdul Qayyum Zakir
(Former Taliban military chief)
Taliban Dadullah Akhund 
(Senior commander)
[26]

Flag of al-Qaeda.svg Osama bin Laden 
(Former Emir of al-Qaeda)
Strength

Islamic Republic of Afghanistan Afghan Armed Forces: 352,000[30]
RSM: 13,000+[31]
High Council of the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan: 3,000–3,500[4]


Formerly:
ISAF: 18,000+[32]

Military Contractors: 20,000+[32]

 Taliban: 60,000
(tentative estimate)[33]

HIG: 1,500–2,000+[37]
Flag of al-Qaeda.svg al-Qaeda: 100–800[38][39][40]


Fidai Mahaz: 8,000[29]
Casualties and losses

Afghan Security Forces:
Dead: 65,596+ killed 'Wounded:16,500+[33]
Coalition:
Dead: 3,486 (all causes)
2,807 (hostile causes)
(United States: 2,356, United Kingdom: 454,[41] Canada: 158, France: 88, Germany: 57, Italy: 53, Others: 321)[42]
Wounded: 22,773 (United States: 19,950, United Kingdom: 2,188, Canada: 635)[43][44][45]
Contractors:
Dead: 4,000+[46][47][48]
Wounded: 15,000+[47][48]

Total killed: 70,664+
Taliban:
Dead: 52,893+ killed (estimate, no official data).[33][49][50]

The Taliban insurgency was an insurgency that began after the group's fall from power during the 2001 War in Afghanistan. The Taliban forces fought against the Afghan government, led by President Hamid Karzai, and later by President Ashraf Ghani, and against a US-led coalition of forces that has included all members of NATO; the 2021 Taliban offensive resulted in the collapse of the government of Ashraf Ghani.

The insurgency had spread to some degree over the border to neighboring Pakistan, in particular Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. The Taliban conducted warfare against Afghan National Security Forces and their NATO allies, as well as against civilian targets. Regional countries, particularly Pakistan, Iran, China and Russia, were often accused of funding and supporting the insurgent groups.[51][52][53][54][55][56][57][58][59][60][61]

The allied Haqqani Network, Hezb-e Islami Gulbuddin (until 2016), and smaller al-Qaeda groups had also been part of the Taliban insurgency.[62][63]

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  5. ^ "Prayer ceremony for Taliban faction's deputy held at Herat Grand Mosque | Ariana News". ariananews.af. 17 May 2021. The group had recently aligned itself with the government, and fighters were sent to Niazi as part of an uprising force to secure a number of Herat districts.
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  38. ^ "Al-Qaeda's Resurrection". Council on Foreign Relations. Retrieved 6 March 2018.
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  59. ^ "Is Russia arming the Afghan Taliban?". BBC News. 2 April 2018.
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  62. ^ Our Man in Kabul? Archived 12 April 2010 at the Wayback Machine by Michael Crowley, tnr.com, 9 March 2010
  63. ^ Morgan, Wesley. "Whatever happened to Al Qaeda in Afghanistan?". POLITICO.

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