Flag of Afghanistan

Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan
Flag of the Taliban.svg
UseNational flag and ensign Small vexillological symbol or pictogram in black and white showing the different uses of the flag Reverse side is congruent with obverse side Small vexillological symbol or pictogram in black and white showing the different uses of the flag
Proportion1:2[1][2]
Adopted
  • 27 October 1997 (1997-10-27) (originally)
  • 15 August 2021 (2021-08-15) (reinstatement)
DesignThe Shahada in black on a white field in the calligraphic Thuluth script
Flag of the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan.svg
Variant flag
UseNational flag and ensign Small vexillological symbol or pictogram in black and white showing the different uses of the flag Small vexillological symbol or pictogram in black and white showing the different uses of the flag Reverse side is congruent with obverse side Small vexillological symbol or pictogram in black and white showing the different uses of the flag
Proportion1:2
DesignThe Shahada in black on a white field, underneath which is "Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan" in Pashto, both written in calligraphic script

The national flag of the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan (Pashto: د افغانستان بیرغ; Dari: پرچم افغانستان[3]), also used as the flag of the Taliban, consists of a white field with a black Shahada. It was adopted on 15 August 2021 with the victory of the Taliban in the 2001–2021 war.[4][5][6][7][8][9] Since the Anglo-Afghan War of 1919, also known as the War of Independence, Afghanistan has used about 19 national flags, more than any other country in this period.[10][11] The national flag had black, red and green colors most of the time during the period.

The tricolor flag of the internationally-recognized Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, which remains in use internationally and by resistance movements against the Taliban inside Afghanistan, has vertical black, red and green stripes. It has the national emblem in white at the center. The emblem, which is surrounded by sheaves of wheat, includes a Shahada; a Takbir; rays of sun; a mosque with a mihrab, minbar and two Afghan flags; the year 1298 (١۲۹٨) in the Solar Hijri calendar (i.e. Gregorian 1919); and an inscription stating Afghanistan (افغانستان). A similar flag with three vertical stripes of the same colors, which had an emblem surrounded by sheaves of wheat, was first flown by King Amanullah Khan in July 1928.

During the Afghan Independence Day rallies in Jalalabad and other cities on 18 and 19 August 2021, the Taliban killed three people and injured over a dozen others for removing Taliban flags and displaying the tricolor Afghan flags.[12][13] On 11 September 2021, four days after reports of defeat of the National Resistance Front of Afghanistan (NRF) in Panjshir,[14] the Taliban hoisted their flag at the presidential palace in Kabul to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks against the United States.[15] The Taliban has issued a decree requiring the use of the Islamic Emirate's flag in all official settings.[4]


Cite error: There are <ref group=lower-alpha> tags or {{efn}} templates on this page, but the references will not show without a {{reflist|group=lower-alpha}} template or {{notelist}} template (see the help page).

  1. ^ Smith, Whitney (1997). "New flags: Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan". The Flag Bulletin. XXXVI-5 (177).
  2. ^ Cite error: The named reference acku was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  3. ^ "Afghanistan Flag". Flags Corner. 9 June 2016. Archived from the original on 17 November 2016. Retrieved 28 August 2019.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  4. ^ a b "Taliban hoist giant flag in Afghan capital, eight months after return". Agence France-Presse. Kabul. France 24. 31 March 2022. Retrieved 4 April 2022.
  5. ^ Chughtai, Alia; Moslih, Hashmat (19 August 2021). "Infographic: Afghanistan's flags over the years". Al Jazeera. Retrieved 4 April 2022.
  6. ^ Dawi, Akmal (14 March 2022). "Afghan Diplomatic Missions in US Close, Remain Open Elsewhere". Voice of America.
  7. ^ Gannon, Kathy (11 September 2021). "Taliban flag rises over seat of power on fateful anniversary". Associated Press. Kabul. Retrieved 4 April 2022.
  8. ^ Bell, Stewart; Semple, Jeff (2 November 2021). "The Taliban is rebranding Kabul with its white flags, but what comes next has Afghans on edge". Global News. Retrieved 4 April 2022.
  9. ^ "Taliban flags proliferate as Afghan tricolour becomes resistance symbol". Agence France-Presse. Kabul. France 24. 23 August 2021. Retrieved 4 April 2022.
  10. ^ "Afghanistan". The World Factbook. Central Intelligence Agency. 11 August 2021. Retrieved 16 August 2021.
  11. ^ Artimovich, Nick; McMillan, Joe; Macdonald, Ian (21 September 2016). "Historical Flags (Afghanistan)". Flags of the World. Archived from the original on 4 July 2017. Retrieved 11 February 2020.
  12. ^ Latifi, Ali M. "Shots fired at Afghan protest against Taliban, 2 reported dead". Al Jazeera.
  13. ^ "Several reported killed as Taliban shoot at crowds waving Afghan flag". The Guardian. 19 August 2021.
  14. ^ "Photos: Afghanistan's last pocket of resistance falls to Taliban". Al Jazeera.
  15. ^ "Taliban flag rises over seat of power on fateful anniversary". AP NEWS. 11 September 2021.

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